New York Shareholder, Member and Partnership Business Disputes In NY: New York Business Disputes & Litigation Basics

New York Business Disputes We handle numerous shareholder and member disputes.  The main reasons for these disputes are because of the lack of an adequate Shareholder, Operations or Partnership Agreement, the lack of due diligence or nefarious acts by a member, shareholder or controlling directors.  Analyzing whether to file a lawsuit is, often, a matter of economics. A civil law suit at the court of first instance may take over a year.  Your attorney in New York will need to file a complaint to in a NY court, file a reply to the defendant, depose witnesses, file pre-trial requests and make numerous appearances in court and at pre-trial conferences.  The process is cumbersome, time consuming and of course will not be cheap. Thus, we, always, sit down with our clients and do a detailed cost-benefit analyses.  Many New York law firms push to file a lawsuit for obvious reasons, however,

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SEC Regulation D – Private Offerings: NY Startup Law

Start-ups in New York looking for investment capital should consider the classification of investors that can and cannot partake in private offerings.  Under the Securities and Exchange Commission’s Regulation D, an organization may issue a private offering of stock to raise funds without officially registering to “go public.” We discussed the nature of Regulation D offerings, which are also called “private placements” in an earlier blog post. Only certain types of investors may participate in a Regulation D offering.  To understand why the SEC encourages certain kinds of investors over others, it is important to understand the different types of investors in the market: Accredited Investor: This is defined as an individual that has earned US$200,000 or more on an annual basis for the past two out of the three years and is likely to make that same amount this year. Alternatively, an accredited investor can fail to meet the income threshold,

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Private Placement Memos Get Start-Ups Moving

Recently, I wrote about the two tools available to small businesses to stir interest and investment – the business plan and the private placement memorandum.  Let’s focus on the private placement memorandum. A Private Placement Memorandum (or PPM for short) is a legal document that organized businesses provide to prospective private investors who may be interested in buying stock or some other kind of security in your business in some kind of private transaction. The PPM will put all of your cards on the table: 1.  Your company’s basics:  Who you are, what you are looking to accomplish and the nature of your business.  This can also include the description of your company and management structure. 2. Your terms:  First and foremost, you will need to identify the rights, restrictions and class of your securities.  This section includes the capitalization of your company before and after offering the securities or

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Terminating A Franchise Agreement In New York: NY Franchise Law Basics

The termination or cancellation of a New York franchise relationship requires planning, a thorough understanding of your particular New York franchise agreement and procedural formalities.  Typically, it is advisable to consult with your franchise lawyer. New York Franchise Terminations (Franchisee Considerations) For example, preparation should begin before signing a franchise agreement by a New York franchisee.  Before signing, a would-be franchisee should consider the written terms outlining the right to terminate the franchise agreement.  Other clauses, of course, should be reviewed.  This post, only, addresses one issue of many that a franchisee should consider. Typically, a franchisor shall lay out several conditions it would consider to be breaches of the franchise agreement that trigger termination.  These conditions will not afford an opportunity for either party to cure or correct the specific condition.  These incurable breaches are, typically, material breaches of franchise agreement and, often, New York law.  In some cases, a

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Successor Liability Pitfalls in New York

When buying or selling a New York business or any of a business’s assets under NY law, potential successor liability of the buyer is of primary concern.  New York Successor Liability Law is complex and the following is, only, intended as a brief overview of the matter. Successor liability in New York is liability that the buyer of a New York company’s assets may have for the liabilities of the seller of those assets performed prior to the purchase.  Essentially, a buyer would be compelled to pay off debt that the seller accumulated prior to completion of the transaction. The general rule in New York is that the buyer of company assets does not assume and is not liable for the seller’s liabilities unless otherwise expressly stated in the asset purchase agreement.  However, exceptions exist. New York Successor Liability Exception to General Rule Express or Implied Assumption by Buyer. This exception

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U.S. Patents for New York businesses

The common types of U.S. patents that are available to innovative New York entrepreneurs seeking to protect their  intellectual property falls into three common categories based on the type of invention in question: design, utility and plant patents. Utility patents are chiefly concerned with how an invention functions.  A utility patent may be applied to a wide range of unique and innovative new products or processes. It prevents others from manufacturing, selling, using or distributing your invention.  Utility patents last for 20 years running from the date that the patent application was filed.  In addition to the initial patent filing fees, inventors must submit maintenance fees throughout the life of the patent in order to keep the patent’s protection. Design patents are any enhancement or adornment applied to an existing item or the design for a new product. It protects the aesthetic appearance and can be issued for the appearance, design,

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New York Non-Compete & Confidentiality Agreements

Business in New York can be highly competitive, and relies, in part, upon a business’s ability to protect valuable information disclosed to current and past employees. Many NY companies feel that implementing non-compete agreements and other contractual obligations will encourage employee retention overall and protect information should an employee leave. It is important for New York businesses to understand, however, that there are restrictions to when and how non-compete agreements can be enforced. Traditionally, non-compete agreements in New York are used in companies and industries involving sensitive proprietary information and/or trade secrets. Non-compete agreements are commonly found across many industries regardless of size or products or services offered. They can take many forms depending on the information to be protected, including confidentiality agreements (prohibiting use or revealing information) and non-solicitation agreements (prohibiting approaching customers, poaching employees or contacting vendors). New York Courts consider the enforcement of a specific non-compete agreement

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The Most Common Ways NY Small Businesses Land In Court & Ways To Avoid The Court Room

Everyday, New York small businesses are served with lawsuits that could have been avoided had they implemented some simple practices that help avoid the court room. On average, a business making $1 million per year will spend about 2%, or about $20,000, per year in legal fees. That means many small businesses pay more, and some spend a lot more, than the average. Since every business needs to keep expenses down to survive, business owners need to recognize the most common legal pitfalls out there that result in litigation: Sued By An Employee: Employment disputes are some of the most common lawsuits that small businesses face because they come in many forms, including employment discrimination claims, wage claims, claims of unsafe work conditions and many more. Most often, such suits are based on some violation or misunderstanding of your business’s employment practices.  Infringement of IP Rights: Businesses often collaborate and share information

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New York S Corp vs. LLC Basics: Choosing your Corporate Entity in New York

Many of our New York law firm clients considering establishing a business entity in New York, often, are conflicted whether they should choose to establish a New York S Corporation (“S Corp”) or a New York limited liability company (“LLC”).  Choosing whether to establish as a New York S Corporation or an LLC is, often, an important decision for a New York company and its shareholders/members, thus, don’t take this choice for granted and consider the pros and cons with New York business-savvy attorney. The following may help initiate the conversation with your New York attorney.  If you are doing a deal with a non-American company or individual make sure to hire an international lawyer with experience working on transnational deals.  Additionally, these corporate forms are, generally, not available for professional corporations (i.e. law firms). NY S Corporation Basics An NY S Corporation is a Pass-Through Entity meaning that each

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New York Partnership & Joint Venture Due Diligence Checklist

We, regretfully, see too many New York, New Jersey and Connecticut companies entering into business relationships with foreign nationals & corporations with little foresight.  Often cultural and divergent business ethics leads to immediate issues.  The following Merger & Acquisition Due Diligence Checklist is intended as a guide to vetting a prospective partner/joint venture for business in New York.  The list is not exhaustive and an experienced New York attorney is, normally, necessary to join your due diligence team.  This list is, also, useful for those doing being with New York companies and individuals, but was specifically tailored based on experience with Asian companies.  Please don’t chase an opportunity without considering the risks.  The cost is, likely, less than you think and risks are, likely, greater than you imagine. This New York-Focused Merger & Acquisition Due Diligence Checklist is not a substitute for retaining a New York attorney to assist with your New

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